brianmichaelbendis:

sequentialsmart:

Pages from Scarlet, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Alex Maleev.

It’s a truly stand-out comic that can turn something as basic as introducing a character’s back story, into a visually memorable sequence.  

At first glace, it just looks like fifteen panels in standard layout. But it’s really fifteen snapshots of the defining moments and characteristics in Scarlet’s life to date. Note that the last panel of a Portland landmark, which breaks the rhythm established so far, is enlarged to emphasize the most telling quality about her.

It’s exposition done as only a comic can do.

https://www.comixology.com/Scarlet/comics-series/4532

(via jessicacabot)

My quality of life would improve substantially if Tumblr would just add timestamps to posts.

twinpeakscaptioned:

(x) (x) (x

shfskjfhsdkfhsdkjfhjksd none of this feels even a little bit real

i still need a roommate for nov. 1

Hi! Me and Jon Bershad need a new roommate in our wonderful apartment for November 1st. Info:

  • $985 a month plus utilities
  • in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn
  • close to a LOT of trains
  • great neighborhood— lots of restaurants and bars and brunch spots, and close to Prospect Park
  • we have a dishwasher and a private laundry room
  • we are both very very cool people

Live with us! Or spread the word so your friend lives with us! Then come hang out with your friend!

Boardwalk Empire came on too eager. It seemed too pleased with itself and too certain we’d agree. It checked off all the boxes as if to demand critical and popular acclaim. It valued style over substance, execution over content, seemingly convinced that a lush period piece with high production values would take care of itself. It spent a lot of time on meandering, unrelated subplots, sometimes prolonging them to a point where it felt like certain characters were on their own separate show. It often lacked a sense of direction, preferring to leisurely follow characters wherever they might lead— and if this was an intentional stylistic choice rather than a storytelling weakness, that didn’t negate its failure to provide compelling hooks.
But it grew on me. I’m not sure why. Maybe just familiarity. Maybe lowered expectations. Maybe a soft spot for ensembles and shifting alliances. Maybe enough characters died for me to finally remember who the remaining characters were. I still saw glaring flaws, but I didn’t mind.
When it started, I felt like the lone grouch insisting the emperor had no clothes. But as the rest of its audience drifted away, I found myself getting more attached, and often felt like its lone defender, silently resenting everyone for never talking about it. It’ll be over in six days, and I’ll miss it when it’s gone.

Boardwalk Empire came on too eager. It seemed too pleased with itself and too certain we’d agree. It checked off all the boxes as if to demand critical and popular acclaim. It valued style over substance, execution over content, seemingly convinced that a lush period piece with high production values would take care of itself. It spent a lot of time on meandering, unrelated subplots, sometimes prolonging them to a point where it felt like certain characters were on their own separate show. It often lacked a sense of direction, preferring to leisurely follow characters wherever they might lead— and if this was an intentional stylistic choice rather than a storytelling weakness, that didn’t negate its failure to provide compelling hooks.

But it grew on me. I’m not sure why. Maybe just familiarity. Maybe lowered expectations. Maybe a soft spot for ensembles and shifting alliances. Maybe enough characters died for me to finally remember who the remaining characters were. I still saw glaring flaws, but I didn’t mind.

When it started, I felt like the lone grouch insisting the emperor had no clothes. But as the rest of its audience drifted away, I found myself getting more attached, and often felt like its lone defender, silently resenting everyone for never talking about it. It’ll be over in six days, and I’ll miss it when it’s gone.

mismatchedwhite said: I've read that ask you got before about Coraline, and just really wanted to tell you that ever since I read it (when I was 12 - 5 years ago) I don't think I became brave, but I think I understood I already was brave. You see, ever since, every time I get afraid (aka anxiety hits) I remember Coraline, and I remember that time when she said "when you're scared but you still do it anyway, that's brave." So thank you, Mr. Gaiman. That was one of the most wonderful gifts I've ever received.

neil-gaiman:

I was in my thirties when I figured that one out, and wrote CORALINE mostly to tell it to my daughters. I’m glad that it’s spread across the world. I’m glad it made your life better.

also applies to improv (cf. fuck your fear)

“I remember trying to merge ‘I Want You Back’ by the Jackson Five to the opening theme of Twin Peaks,” Dulli says of the writing of “Debonair.” “I actually do feel like I was successful. Lyrically, it was my own personal dressing down of myself. It’s self-flagellating.”

This is one of my favorite Afghan Whigs songs (and should be a go-to if you’ve just fucked up a relationship and want to wallow in how much you hate yourself).

I love Dulli’s description of it, mostly because, if I didn’t know the song, I would have no clue how to begin imagining a cross between “I Want You Back” and the Twin Peaks theme. Also because I love all of Dulli’s influences so much, and I love watching someone take them in, put them through a filter, and spit them back out as something completely different and original.

Also, since it’s here: one of the best album covers ever.

(Source: daysrunaway, via circuitbird)

Tags: afghan whigs

thomasmwilson:

womaninterrupted:

detectivedeathmachine:

[ Source ]

Happy birthday, Oscar Wilde!

My favorite smart-ass

I try so hard to sound like this guy.

My food looks like it has lips. I hope it sings “Science Fiction Double Feature” at me.

My food looks like it has lips. I hope it sings “Science Fiction Double Feature” at me.

i’m being weird and obsessive about podcasts

I never listened to them until a few weeks ago. Now I’ve started listening to a large number of them, and I’m starting each one from the beginning and slowly working my way through every episode. This is probably inadvisable, but I’m doing it anyway, because I am an obsessive completist.

Here’s what I’ve started so far, and what year I’m up to (I’m not that deep into any of them):

  • This American Life (1996)
  • Radiolab (2002)
  • Point Of Inquiry (2006)
  • SModcast (2007)
  • The Flop House (2008)
  • WTF With Marc Maron (2009)
  • Thelema Now (2010)
  • Tell ‘Em Steve-Dave (2010)
  • Don’t Get Me Started (2014)

I’m doing a few episodes of each at a time, and doing more episodes of the earlier ones than the later ones, so I can gradually close the gap. The next one I’m adding is Best Show, and then Sound Of Young America/Bullseye. I have a really, really, really long list of podcasts to add to my list, and I’m prioritizing them by how early they started.

If you’re ever bored while I’m at work, ask/tell me which old podcast I’m listening to, what I think of it, what I’ve learned by listening to years-old disposable entertainment that nobody in 2014 was meant to listen to, what my favorites and least favorites are, whether or not I’ve grown tired of the whole thing, why I’m doing this, how my brain has changed by listening to lots of recordings of people talking, which podcasts I should add to my list (but don’t hold your breath), what your favorite episodes are that I should look forward to, or what’s wrong with me.

Tags: podcasts